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Articles from Springer a leading global scientific publisher of scientific books and journals. - dna paternity @ Sun, 22 Apr 2018 at 07:32 AM
Genetics and Tropical Forests - Tropical Forestry Handbook @ 2021-01-01
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Genetics and Tropical Forests - Tropical Forestry Handbook @ 2021-01-01
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Prenatal Maternal Distress: A Risk Factor for Child Anxiety? - Clinical Child and Family Psychology Review @ 2018-06-01
The deleterious association between various types of prenatal maternal psychological distress (PNMS, anxiety, depression, psychological distress, stress) and childhood anxiety symptomatology (internalizing behaviors, anxiety symptoms) has been established using both retrospective and prospective longitudinal studies across varied demographic cohorts and throughout development. Yet, the existing literature cannot claim maternal distress during pregnancy to be a specific risk factor for anxiety symptomatology, as studies utilizing such observational designs are unable to adequately account for confounding of potential genetic factors and the postnatal environment. In this review, we examine studies that attempt to minimize such confounding and thus disentangle the unique intrauterine exposure effect of varying types of PNMS on childhood anxiety symptomatology. Such methodologies include paternal versus maternal comparison studies, sibling comparisons, prenatal cross-fostering designs and timing of exposure studies (including disaster studies). Of the identified studies, findings indicate that prenatal maternal distress is likely to constitute a risk factor for anxiety symptomatology, although more studies are needed to replicate current findings in order to determine whether there are clear differences in effects across specific types of PNMS and for specific subpopulations. We review the methodological limitations and strengths of the literature prior to exploring avenues of future research and implications for theory and clinical practice.
 
The reproductive biology of stingless bees is poorly understood, especially when compared to other groups of social bees with great ecological and economic importance. However, research on this topic has grown over the past few years, mostly driven by technological advances in molecular biology. Here, we aimed to review several recent developments in the research of stingless bee reproduction, including the mating systems of stingless bees, reproductive strategies of queens, inbreeding and diploid male production, as well as conflicts over male production. We also briefly explore topics that have not substantially advanced, highlighting the gaps that need to be further investigated. Understanding the reproductive biology of stingless bees can aid conservation efforts for these important pollinators and improve management practices that promote their sustainable economic use.
 
Previous research on the equine major histocompatibility complex (MHC) demonstrated strong correlations between haplotypes defined by polymorphic intra-MHC microsatellites and haplotypes defined using classical serology. Here, we estimated MHC diversity in a sample of 124 Arabian horses from an endangered strain native to Iran (Persian Asil Arabians), using a validated 10-marker microsatellite panel. In a group of 66 horses related as parent-offspring pairs or half-sibling groups, we defined 51 MHC haplotypes, 49 of which were new. In 47 of the remaining 58 unrelated horses, we could assign one previously identified MHC haplotype, and by default, we gave provisional haplotype status to the remaining constellation of microsatellite alleles. In these horses, we found 21 haplotypes that we had previously defined and 31 provisional haplotypes, two of which had been identified in an earlier study. This gave a total of 78 new MHC haplotypes. The final 11 horses were MHC heterozygotes that we could not phase using information from any of the previously validated or provisional haplotypes. However, we could determine that these horses carried a total of 22 different undefined haplotypes. In the overall population sample, we detected three homozygous horses and one maternally inherited recombinant from 21 informative segregations. Virtually all of the horses tested were MHC heterozygotes, and most unrelated horses (98%) were heterozygous for rare microsatellite-defined haplotypes found less than three times in the sampled horses. This is evidence for a very high level of MHC haplotype variation in the Persian Asil Arabian horse.
 
Title: - Primates @ 2018-04-18
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Title: - Primates @ 2018-04-18
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Title: - Conservation Genetics @ 2018-04-12
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Title: - Conservation Genetics @ 2018-04-12
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Title: - Genetic Resources and Crop Evolution @ 2018-04-07
A set of 23 local varieties from Slovenia and 218 fig accessions from Californian fig germplasm collection were compared to determine the identity of genotypes and their possible genetic relationships. Figs were genotyped using twelve microsatellite loci. One hundred alleles were identified over all microsatellite loci with an average of 8.33 alleles per locus and a polymorphic information content of 0.557 per locus. DNA genotyping demonstrated a relatively high level of genetic diversity between analysed figs. Comparison of fig genotypes from Slovenia and California demonstrated that only six Slovenian varieties shared identical DNA profiles with figs from the Californian collection, while the other 17 Slovenian varieties were unique and characteristic to the North Adriatic region. The information obtained will contribute to a better management of fig genetic resources.
 
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