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Articles from Springer a leading global scientific publisher of scientific books and journals. - dna paternity @ Mon, 24 Sep 2018 at 07:31 AM
Genetics and Tropical Forests - Tropical Forestry Handbook @ 2021-01-01
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Genetics and Tropical Forests - Tropical Forestry Handbook @ 2021-01-01
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NO SQL Approach for Handling Bioinformatics Data Using MongoDB - Emerging Technologies in Data Mining and Information Security @ 2019-01-01
Proliferation of genomic, diagnostic, medical, and other forms of biological data resulted in categorizing of biological data as bigdata. The low-cost sequencing machinery, even in small research labs, is generating large volumes of data which now needs to be mined for useful biological features and knowledge. In this paper, we have used a NoSQL approach to handle the repeat information of the entire human genome. A total of 12 million repeats have been extracted from the entire human genome and have been stored using MongoDB, a popular NoSQL database. A web application has been developed to query data from the database at ease. It is evident that bioinformaticians tend to shift their database development approach from traditional relational model to novel approaches like NoSQL in order to handle the massive amounts of biological data.
 
The paper approaches the field of biomedicine as an example of a modern science–society relationship by means of identifying and analysing the range of public encounters with this field of research and practice, and the differing communication models underlying these encounters. Guided by theoretical and empirical research into science communication and public understanding of science, the paper classifies public encounters with biomedicine into three general types related to (1) consuming—learning about biomedicine from different media and formats of popular culture, (2) experiencing—accumulating personal experience from biomedical practices, and (3) governing—getting engaged in the processes of decision-making on biomedicine. It is argued that the various formats of encounters each have a definite role and contribution to embedding and steering the development of biomedicine in modern society, yet, given the nature of this field as provoking both public interest and dissent, it is important that these formats are mutually well balanced and guided by a dialogue-based and participatory paradigm.
 
 
 
 
 
Title: - Molecular Biology Reports @ 2018-10-01
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Title: - Molecular Biology Reports @ 2018-10-01
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The introduction of chromosomal microarray (CMA) into the prenatal setting has involved considerable deliberation due to the wide range of possible outcomes (e.g., copy number variants of uncertain clinical significance). Such issues are typically discussed in pre-test counseling for pregnant women to support informed decision-making regarding prenatal testing options. This research study aimed to assess the level of informed decision-making with respect to prenatal CMA and the factor(s) influencing decision-making to accept CMA for the selected prenatal testing procedure (i.e., chorionic villus sampling or amniocentesis). We employed a questionnaire that was adapted from a three-dimensional measure previously used to assess informed decision-making with respect to prenatal screening for Down syndrome and neural tube defects. This measure classifies an informed decision as one that is knowledgeable, value-consistent, and deliberated. Our questionnaire also included an optional open-ended question, soliciting factors that may have influenced the participants’ decision to accept prenatal CMA; these responses were analyzed qualitatively. Data analysis on 106 participants indicated that 49% made an informed decision (i.e., meeting all three criteria of knowledgeable, deliberated, and value-consistent). Analysis of 59 responses to the open-ended question showed that “the more information the better” emerged as the dominant factor influencing both informed and uninformed participants’ decisions to accept prenatal CMA. Despite learning about the key issues in pre-test genetic counseling, our study classified a significant portion of women as making uninformed decisions due to insufficient knowledge, lack of deliberation, value-inconsistency, or a combination of these three measures. Future efforts should focus on developing educational approaches and counseling strategies to effectively increase the rate of informed decision-making among women offered prenatal CMA.
 
 
 
Title: - Molecular Biology Reports @ 2018-10-01
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Title: - Molecular Biology Reports @ 2018-10-01
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Found 17 Articles for dna paternity